Sharon Kimathi, Energy and ESG Editor, Reuters Digital

Earth Day this year follows weeks of extreme weather with temperatures hitting a record 45.4 degrees Celsius (113.7 Fahrenheit) in Thailand, and another punishing heatwave in India where at least 13 people died of heatstroke at a ceremony last weekend.

It also comes as a new study by climate scientists shows that the world could breach a new average temperature record in 2023 or 2024, fuelled by climate change and the anticipated return of the El Nino weather phenomenon.

The run-up to the 54th annual celebration of the environment, officially marked on Saturday, has included a week of conservation and clean-up activities around the world. On Saturday, volunteers will begin major clean-up campaigns at Lake Dal in India’s Srinigar and Florida’s hurricane-hit Cape Coral.

Climate activists will also be urging governments to do more to combat climate change to mark Earth Day, with four days of events known as the “Big One” in London, organized by the Extinction Rebellion activist group.

Climate Buzz

  1. World could face record temperatures in 2023 as El Nino returns

The world could breach a new average temperature record in 2023 or 2024, fuelled by climate change and the anticipated return of the El Nino weather phenomenon, climate scientists say.

People take a break under a cooling mist as the Japanese government issues a warning over a possible power crunch due to a heatwave in Tokyo, Japan June 28, 2022. REUTERS/Issei Kato

  1. Activists mark Earth Day as scientists warn of more extreme weather

Volunteers in dozens of countries were set to plant trees, clean up trash and urge governments to do more to combat climate change to mark Earth Day, as scientists warn of more extreme weather and record temperatures this year.

  1. India’s heatwaves putting economy, development goals at risk – study

Killer heat waves are putting “unprecedented burdens” on India’s agriculture, economy and public health, with climate change undermining the country’s long-term efforts to reduce poverty, inequality and illness, a new study showed.

  1. Dutch court hears ‘greenwashing’ complaint against KLM over misleading ads

A Dutch court heard arguments against KLM from non-profit group Fossil Free for alleged “greenwashing” in advertisements that suggested flying with the airline is not a bad choice from an environmental perspective.

  1. Biden to sign executive order on ‘environmental justice’

United States President Joe Biden plans to sign an executive order directing federal agencies to put more focus on environmental policies that do harm to communities, according to the White House.

CREDIT: Reuters

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here